Suzuki S-32 / S-32C

 
(2)

The Suzuki corporation was established in 1953 in Hamamatsu, Japan. It has since grown into one of the world’s leading manufacturers of musical instruments for education.

Make: Suzuki
Model name: S-32 and S-32C
Reed type: Multi reed plates, phosphor bronze
Dimensions: 43 x 10 x 5cm
Weight: 660g (case: 345g)
Keys: 32
Country of manufacture: Unknown
Player level: Beginner
Mouthpiece: 2 types (MP-121, MP-113)
Features: Soprano
Year of manufacture: Unknown

If you have any more information, please post in the reviews below
If you have extra images, please contact Melodica World
Please only rate this instrument if you have had experience of playing it

2 Reviews

  1. Kevin

    I have owned the S-32C I believe this is the same instrument but I'm not sure what the "C" indicates? According to Suzuki's website and some online merchants the "C" model is the one available now.rnThis melodica has a lot going for it. It has a nice one piece rounded metal body with plastic end caps. It plays well with an even keyboard.rnThe sound is very brilliant even loud, This may be the loudest melodica I have played. rnThe real highlight of this instrument is the range. You have seven notes from the F-sharp up to the High C that no other melodica has (the Mylodica Soloist is the same range but I believe this is the same instrument.The yellow and white carrying bag they offer looks identical and the aforementioned range is the same) . It can really put you into a different space sonically as it's lowest note F is above a middle C. rnNegatives: The screws to disassemble it are very tiny. You really need a jeweler's screwdriver. Unfortunately the one I owned had a reed that would not sound so I returned it. One of it's positives could also be a negative the volume was so powerful I had trouble playing it in a quiet manner around the house. I also wish they had offered this pitch range with a full 3 octave compass down to middle C.rnI would recommend this melodica to anyone playing in an acoustic ensemble such as with brass or a banjo or other loud instrument. It's volume and high range would allow you to have a sonic identity that doesn't get muddied with the band.rnrn

  2. beezer

    This is a great instrument - I am able to play soft as well as loud on mine, maybe because I've played it a lot and have "broken it in."? I also gapped it , just a little, didn't fuss too much.rnrnTake care when opening the instrument up for tuning etc! I reassembled it without wetting the gasket first so now it it leaks. Also, because of this leak, I overtightened the screws and stripped a screw hole. Tried epoxy to rebuild the hole so the screw would grab - not a very successful repair.rnBut unless I have to play really long phrases on one breath , I don't really notice the leak too much.