Hohner Melodica Piano 36

 
(3)
 

Hohner is a musical instrument manufacturer with a reputation for innovative design and invention. The company was founded in Germany by Matthias Hohner in 1857, who began making harmonicas with his wife and one other employee. During the 1950s the Hohner company added a newly invented instrument they named ‘melodica’ to their catalogue. The melodica was a success, and was soon copied by several other companies around the world.

The Hohner Melodica Piano 36 is the successor to the Hohner Melodica Professional 36, and it replaced the wooden insides with plastic. The first Hohner 36 melodicas had accordion-style single reed plates.

Make: Hohner
Model name: Melodica Piano 36
Reed type: Multi reed plates
Dimensions: Unknown
Weight: Unknown
Keys: 36
Country of manufacture: Unknown
Player level: Pro
Features: None
Year of manufacture: Unknown. Now discontinued

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3 Reviews

  1. Quetscher

    This has been my favorite melodica for years (and it would still be if I hadn’t purchased a Vibrandoneon).rnIt has a shell made of solid metal, three reed plates with 12 brass reeds (one octave) per plate.rnIt comes with a bag, a trumpet mouthpiece and a strangely bowed mouthpiece of about 15cm length which ends “above” keyboard level and gives you a better opportunity to look down at the keyboard while playing.rnThe moisture hole can be covered with a cap, moisture can be blown out easily. During all the years I played it I had almost no problems with sticky reeds or reeds that get out of tune because of moisture.rnFirst thing you realize when playing is the extremely smooth but responsive keyboard action.rnThen when you listen to the sound you will be embarrassed by the silky tone, warm and bright but not too aggressive. rnThe only thing I personally don’t like is the keyboard springs can be heard quite loud while playing.rnrnPros:rnKeyboard actionrnGreat reed qualityrnGreat sound, very bright but not too shrillrnTrumpet mouthpiecernAlmost no problems with moisturernrnCons:rnThe springs can be heard quite loud while playing

  2. Kevin

    rnThe end caps are plastic but the bottom plate which has a very shallow V shape is made of metal. The melodica doesn’t have any holes anywhere in the body so if you are recording you want to turn the keyboard side towards the mic.rnThe body is the same length as other brands of melodicas but with only 36 notes means there’s room to make the keys slightly wider. You wouldn’t think this would make a difference but it is quite surprising how much more comfortable it is to play on, especially if you are coming from a full size keyboard background.rnWhere I think the instruments sufferers is airflow. It’s not very even across the keyboard and I have to blow harder and softer in different octaves and there is a bit of delay from breath to note. Hohner’s philosophy seems to be to have air channels, instead of blowing straight across the reeds. When you look inside the mouthpiece connects to a long channel that leads down to the highest notes first.rnThe sound is quite sweet, but can be shrill if you don't regulate with your breath. With no sound holes and the air channels the attack of the notes is diffuse and less distinct. Fast passages can become a slurry of notes.rnThe keys are connected to arms that lift the pallets squarely so it's almost impossible to bend a note.rnDespite a bit of clacking this is the most comfortable keyboard, I wish some other manufacturers would copy it's design. Instead of sizing the keys to children's hands furthering the idea that melodicas are toys.rn

  3. albalex

    rnI finally decided and bought the melodic Hohner HM-36. Great is the mechanical keys and sound. I prefer this model to those Suzuki. I finally found peace ......