Yamaha P37D vs Suzuki M37

Homepage Forums Buying a melodica Yamaha P37D vs Suzuki M37

This topic contains 74 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by  Julie C. 1 month, 1 week ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 74 total)
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  • #5945

    Davide Valdo
    Participant

    Hello everybody; I’m looking for an instrument to play gipsy jazz manouche music. Research and budget brought me to these two products. I would really like a warm dark sound, without too much ring in it. Besides, Suzuki M37 features a metal body which is a plus for aesthetics and tactile feeling, and I believe that timbre gets enhanced as well.

    What do you suggest?

    #5946

    beezer
    Participant

    Hi Davide,
    A while back I made a quick recording comparing Yamaha P37D and Suzuki M37C to help someone else decide what to buy. please ignore the video – I don’t know how to make video, and what I ended up with to get it in You Tube format can make you a little seasick to watch…
    There are 5 short phrases. Each time, the Yamaha P37D is the one you hear first.


    #5948

    Davide Valdo
    Participant

    Thank you! The Yamaha seems to have a richer tone but the Suzuki sounds a lot warmer

    #5949

    Alan Brinton
    Participant

    Both are terrific melodicas. A bit of ringiness, though, has been my only complaint abut the Suzuki M37C. Listen to Daren’s clip on circular breathing for an excellent demonstration of the sound of the P-37D. The Suzuki doesn’t sound warmer to me, but “warmer” is kind of subjective — maybe the Suzuki has more “presence,” speaking of subjectivity!

    #5950

    Davide Valdo
    Participant

    Yes, I do not really think that it’s possible to actually understand how an instrument sounds like just through a recording. By “warmer” I mean a darker sound, what do you mean by “presence”? “Presence” makes me think of volume. Thank you!

    #5951

    Alan Brinton
    Participant

    Volume would be part of it, yes. The Yamaha sound is somewhat muted in comparison, has less of an edge to it. The Suzuki sounds more “alive.” It’s hard to explain!

    #5961

    Binyomin
    Participant

    I would describe it as the Yamaha sounding more like an accordion or saxophone while the Suzuki sounding more like a harmonica or clarinet, relatively speaking. I’d kind of describe the difference between my Hammond 44 and Hammond 44HP in similar terms.

    #6598

    Carter
    Participant

    I’m in the same boat as Davide. I want to get a professional melodica and want to play Irish jigs, as well as funky and jazz music. I’m thinking the Suzuki will do it for me since it is a bit clearer, but it does seem a slight bit muted from the recording. But the Yamaha sounds a bit accordion-y and a little too Irish-y. I really do love both, would you guys still reccomend the Suzuki for my needs?

    #6599

    Alan Brinton
    Participant

    My final vote is for the Yamaha, which I do not think will disappoint. Some will find the Suzuki harsh in comparison. I’m a big Suzuki fan but think Yamaha is the safer bet if a choice between the two is necessary. If I could have only one melodica, it would be the Yamaha P-32D. P-37D if I had to have 36 or 37 keys. But why not both?

    #6600

    Carter
    Participant

    Well, I’d like to own only one melodica. I mean, the Yamaha does seem a bit richer, but it also seems a little too accordion-y for my tastes. I also love the gig bag the Suzuki comes in, but that isn’t really a deal maker for me. Why do you think the Yamaha is safer? I just love how clear the Suzuki is, but I’m brand new to melodicas so there might be something I’m missing on the Yamaha.

    #6601

    Alan Brinton
    Participant

    I guess I think the Yamaha is a safer bet because there’s a greater risk of being disappointed in the sound of the Suzuki when you actually play it. I play both regularly (though usually the 32 key models, P-32D and M-32C), and I like both, but the Suzuki has a harsher, edgier sound, which is more pronounced in the M37C — other people have commented about this.

    It’s a matter of personal preference, of course. But this is my reason for thinking the Yamaha is the safer choice.

    #6602

    Carter
    Participant

    Interesting, I don’t hear the harsh/edgy sound in the video above, but both instruments obviously will sound different in person. I’m thinking. The Yamaha is just accordion-y as I said before, I should keep listening to sound clips online and then make my decision.

    #6603

    Melodica-Me
    Participant

    Carter, you will find with time that even between the same brand of Melodica’s, Melodions, or even Pianicas the sound will vary. I own a lot of melodicas and see this in all of them. You need to go with your instinct and choose one you feel best fits your current taste. Once you get used to it and understand what sound it can produce the chances are you will buy a different Melodica to achieve that sound. I have stated this in other post, one Melodica will not fit all your needs. Also what you hear on You tube may not be what you hear when you actually get it and play it. They are recorded with different microphone and like melodicas they produce a different sound especially if it is a low grade microphone. I do not own a Yamaha but I understand what Alan is saying about edgier sound on the Suzukies, they do have a brighter and sharper sound than that of other melodicas.

    Melodica-Me
    Monsters of Melodica

    #6604

    Carter
    Participant

    Thanks Melodica-Me. The whole microphone thing bugs me too. I just wish I knew people who owned these instrumemts. I’m still deciding. The Yamaha sounds Irish-y, rich, and happy. The Suzuki sounds a bit darker, clearer, but a bit more funky to me (from what I can get from recordings online). Hopefully I’ll make a decision. I also like the black color of the Suzuki and its gig bag, but if the Yamaha does suit me better i will get that. Man, so tough!

    #6605
    Daren Banarsë
    Daren Banarsë
    Keymaster

    I play both and prefer the Yamaha. I like the tone, and also the evenness of tone throughout the whole keyboard. The Suzuki has a few notes which resonate too much and stick out. I find the Yamaha to have a warmer sound than the Suzuki.

    I think you’ll find that everyone describes them very differently. In reality they’re not really that different from each other! Players make their own sound. Different microphones also create very different results.

    I wouldn’t agree that one sounds happy and the other darker or funkier. Its how you play it! But the Suzuki is to my ears a little clearer.

    I vote for the Yamaha

    Maybe just get the one that looks nicer to you? You’ll get the other one sooner or later anyway 🙂

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