Mylodica

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This topic contains 18 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Alan Brinton 1 year, 6 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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  • #1448
    Melodica World
    Melodica World
    Keymaster

    Mylodica discussions, moved from ‘Buying Criteria’ thread…

    #1425

    Quetscher
    Participant

    Hi Alan,

    if you like harmonica-like sounding melodicas, this could be something for you (beginnig at about 2:30)…

    I would personally be extremely careful buying a MyLodica, I made bad experience just like some others, but the sound is good (much better than the performance!).

    I don’t know which soprano melodica is inside the MyLodica Soloist, perhaps somebody else knows? Would be cheaper to try out without the MyLodica shell.

    @Troy: This could be a good comparison video, too.

    #1427

    Quetscher
    Participant

    Sorry, here’s the link…

    #1429

    Quetscher
    Participant

    Don’t understand, I really tried…

    So, once again!

    #1430

    Alan Brinton
    Participant

    I’m still not seeing the link, Quetscher.

    I own a soprano Mylodica, and I just took it apart. I suspected that it contained the works of a Suzuki S-32C, and that seems to be confirmed by comparison with my M-32C. I don’t have an S-32C, and I haven’t yet disassmbled my M-32C, but I could already see that the tube into which the mouthpiece inserts looks the same. Through the vents on the M-32C, I can see that the bottom cover of the inside of the melodica is the same kind and color of plastic, an ivory color. The dimensions of the keys are the same, and both keyboards have an identifal “C” embossed into the bottom C in exactly the same position. Sherlock Holmes would surely say “It’s elementary, my dear Watson” at this point, at least that it’s a soprano melodion made by Suzuki. Also, the white felt strip along the front of the keyboards looks identical. And my Mylodica came in a Suzuki S-32C case, into which is barely fits. So our wooden enclosure costs about 200 bucks. I see that the S-32C is now under $100 at Amazon.

    The wizard behind the curtain slid out easily after the two Robertson bolts on the end cover were loosened. This is the easist melodica in the world to take apart. Once it’s out of the enclosure, this melodica is much easier to play (ergonomically) and is noticeably louder. I’ll have to examine my M-32C to have a clearer understanding of this, but some plastic has been somewhat crudely sawed off where the air would vent out through a spit valve, and a wad of blue-green material is plugging the exit tube and pushes up against a felt (?) square glued onto the end cover. Possibly if you blew hard while it’s disassembled without pressing any keys, the wad would be expelled.

    I think I like this melodica better now that it has been released from captivity. I’ll play it like this for a while and then put the thing back together, because it sure looks good that way. But the wooden enclosure weights 549 grams, while the Suzuki insert comes in at 513 grams. I notice now that the bare naked melodica has “M-32C2” on the bottom, which seems to seal the deal: this must be the soprano version of the alto M-32C, which I suppose might or might not be the same as the S-32C.

    I said in another thread that I was thinking of trying to mount an alto in the Mylodica housing. I might still, but the alto would have to be disfigured in the process.

    #1431

    Alan Brinton
    Participant

    I see the link now. This is a video I have already viewed several times. Jones sure can bend his notes.

    I found that it works better to just paste the address into the message rather than using the Link button.

    #1433

    Quetscher
    Participant

    Chapeau Holmes, I’m impressed by your inquisitorial work!

    What you write about the inside of the MyLodica seems to confirm that they just try to make money with the emperor’s new clothes. I’m sure that a skilled carpenter could do better. By the way I could guess they don’t buy a whole soprano melodion but only the inside without the shell which makes it still cheaper. But why not as long as people (like me and you) pay the price?!?

    Thanks for the information just to paste the link, that’s what I did the last time and it worked well.

    #1434

    Alan Brinton
    Participant

    My guess is that they buy the whole melodica, which would explain why mine came in the soprano Suziki melodion case. The volume of their sales on Mylodicas, especially on the soprano, is probably too small to justify setting up a special arrangement to order just the insides. I think it’s true that a good woodworker or finish carpenter could do as well if not better. But the workmanship is not bad, and I don’t begrudge them for making some money on their design. So I don’t feel like I’m being ripped off. This design could be improved upon, though. It doesn’t seem to me to be an acoustic design at all; I seriously doubt that the wooden case enhances the sound. That cigar box melodica we’ve seen probably has more acoustical affect, while the wooden case of the Mylodica probably just muffles the sound (he said, not really knowing what’s he’s talking about). What people hear and feel is influenced by what they’re seeing while it’s being played, so the wood has its effects. But this is not like the sound box of a violin or guitar. The trick would be to create something that is, but that is neither too bulky nor too fragile. I think it would take a musical instrument craftsman rather than just a woodworker.

    #1435

    Quetscher
    Participant

    My guess is that they buy the whole melodica, which would explain why mine came in the soprano Suziki melodion case.

    Again, the better guess is yours.

    You’re quite right with what you said about the wooden shell muffling the sound, but that’s an acoustic effect as well, and I’m sure it’s exactly the effect they were reaching for because many people (including me, that’s why I ordered the MyLodica) like that fantastic cassotto-like tone.

    On the other hand I was very disappointed with the poor contition of the instrument. The holes on the bottom were not drilled properly so that the edges were tattered (I hope that’s the right word), the back panel was damaged and repaired insufficiently, only filled with a little wood-coloured glue but not even sanded, the bottom was fixed with two different-coloured screws… Of course this is only cosmetical, but it continued with real problems: the tube is much too short to play the MyLodica on a table; it doesn’t stay in tune too well; the keyboard is sticky and doesn’t allow glissandi; the wooden construction is too heavy…

    But in fact this isn’t a thread about the MyLodica but about buying criteria; and perhaps the workmanship (or whatever you want to call it) belongs to those criteria – because who wants to buy an instrument whose outsides seem to be damaged?

    #1460
    Daren Banarsë
    Daren Banarsë
    Keymaster

    When my Mylodica arrived n the post a few years ago, I have to admit, I was immediately disappointed with the sound. It’s not a bad sound, but for the price, I was expecting something a little special, perhaps along the lines of the Hammond 44HP.

    The case on mine was neatly finished/varnished, but very basic in design. No hardwood, or dovetail joints like the Vibrandoneon – more akin to flatpack ‘ikea’ furniture.

    I used it a lot, because I really like the look of it, and it does have a warm sound and even keyboard. I was very interested in what melodica had been places inside, and my research led me to the Angel Melodyhorn 37. Compared to the Angel Melodyhorn, the Mylodica had no tonal advantages, but was the clear aesthetic winner.

    I had two problems with the Mylodica. Firstly, the plastic section was actually jammed inside, and couldn’t be removed for tuning. Secondly, there was no moisture release valve in the wooden casing. This resulted in the end section of wood warping, and an ugly gap forming between this piece and the main body.

    mylodica damage

    #1465

    Melodica-Me
    Participant

    Troy, I have to agree that the workmanship of the Mylodica casket seams to have been built by a novice woodworker rather than that of a furniture maker type woodworker/cabinetmaker. The idea is good unfortunately it does not do anything for the actual sound as “ADVERTISED” I am not saying this is a switch and bate thing but more or a snake oil type deal. The look is definately what lures people to it, but the excitement dies quick with its performance. I wonder if the manufacture of the Angel Melodyhorn is aware that the drive train to this Mylodica is one of the same??? Like I mentioned in my review of the Mylodica the plus is that you are able to bend notes very easy. By the way the reason that the wood warps as it does in the picture that Troy Shows is that the moisture is only on one side of the board and not on both sides and that outside has a sealer and the inside does not. The way to prevent this is to actually seal the interior with a good water proof material at least once a year if minimal use and twice a year if you are a heavy player like me.
    Melodica-Me

    #1466

    Alan Brinton
    Participant

    I had to look up “cassotto,” being relatively ignorant about accordions. Now I get it.

    My observations are about the soprano Mylodica, and I have no idea what’s inside the alto.

    I’m puzzled about the box warping, since there’s nowhere (in the soprano, at least) for moisture to escape from the inner melodica other than back out through the mouthpiece opening, which I guess means it should be stored mouthpiece end down. But if you’re blowing without a mouthpiece, maybe some of the air and moisture is entering the outer chamber, as happens with my Suzuki M-32.

    #1468

    Alan Brinton
    Participant

    Good idea to move this to Melodica Discussions. Is Melodica Discussions meant to be dedicated to discussion of particular models? I wonder if it might be good to make that more explicit, or alternatively to have a heading specifically for discussion of particular models or series of melodicas?

    #1477

    Kevin
    Participant

    Troy, I take it you own the Mylodica and the Melodyhorn both? I wonder if you might put up a back to back comparison video at some point? It might save some people from the disappointment you felt?

    #1478

    Alan Brinton
    Participant

    Maybe they ran out of Suzukis and crammed a Melodyhorn in Troy’s instead.

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